Beretta is a POS, part II

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photohause
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Post by photohause »

“You didn’t finish school, did you?

armedpolak
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Post by armedpolak »

I know. It’s on my 100% and I owned up to it by being upfront about kind of ammo I shot before I even contacted them. Still there are companies and business owners that would do right by me if anything out of shame of putting a POS product. I’m 41 and still haven’t learned I guess…

zeebaron
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Post by zeebaron »

I have had to contact 3 gun companies (not Beretta) for missing parts or malfunction issues. All 3 offered to send replacement parts no questions asked, with no proof of purchase even. An outstanding standard I've never encountered in any other industry. I'd be real f'in pissed.

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TheSurvivalist
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Post by TheSurvivalist »

That sucks man, sorry to hear about that and the way they are handling it.

I always liked those little .32s, my Dad had a stainless version that I put a ton of rounds through and didn't have any problems. I actually bought it for him as a gift and specifically avoided the blue versions because of the cracking issues I read about. This was 15 years ago, I would have thought they'd fixed that shit by now, but I guess not. Shame cause it looks like a cool little pistol.

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lakelandman
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Post by lakelandman »

45caldan wrote:
Sun Sep 12, 2021 9:45 am
lakelandman wrote:
Sat Sep 11, 2021 7:36 pm
I have no problem with Beretta I just think people need to take ownership and when it comes to guns people learn an expensive lesson I mean Google the F&^% out of the gun and you will see what people have done to it so you don't. I feel for you as a gun owner but I just Google Tomcat and you will see the problems people have with it. I just did a few searches on the internet and even with the right ammo it's still a POS gun and to stay away from it even with the right ammo frames still crack.
I have a problem with a company that doesn't take ownership of a POS and treat the customer right along with keeping a gun in their line up with such known issues.

Beretta really doesn't make anything I want outside of shotguns maybe.
A lot of gun companies I have seen sell one POS gun if people would stop buying them I think they would stop making them and maybe not.
Everybody's got plans... until they get hit.

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SteyrAUG
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Post by SteyrAUG »

I can sorta see both sides.

But honestly most people just look at the side of the gun, read .380 and proceed accordingly. It's not like dropping .357s into a .38, it's not like loading 9mm +P+ and not understanding what that is.

So if there is a "non specialty" .380 round that the Beretta is not rated for, that probably needs to be engraved on the slide. Guns get resold, often without the paperwork. How did this gun survive proof round testing?

The specific ammo involved is NOT rated +P or anything like that. Almost nobody is going to research the specific ft.lbs of energy for a standard round because it is a standard round. That kind of research is only going to be done when considering defensive ammo.

The .380 is already a sorta hot round, so if you make one, you should make it pretty sturdy and 40 ft.lbs of energy should not be able to make a difference between "normal function" and "catastrophic failure."

As a result of being made aware if this issue, I will never buy another Beretta product for myself and I will discontinue sales of Beretta firearms completely. Too many customers look to the retailer to "make things right" when it comes to this stuff and that usually translates to me assuring them that the manufacturer will take care of them.

Thankfully I don't stand to lose a lot, I don't sell a lot of Beretta products. But I have sold a few Bobcats set up with suppressors and it is usually a nice host gun. But if Beretta won't stand behind their .380 Tomcats, I'm not gonna try and sell anything they make.

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45caldan
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Post by 45caldan »

SteyrAUG wrote:
Wed Sep 15, 2021 1:01 am
I can sorta see both sides.

But honestly most people just look at the side of the gun, read .380 and proceed accordingly. It's not like dropping .357s into a .38, it's not like loading 9mm +P+ and not understanding what that is.

So if there is a "non specialty" .380 round that the Beretta is not rated for, that probably needs to be engraved on the slide. Guns get resold, often without the paperwork. How did this gun survive proof round testing?

The specific ammo involved is NOT rated +P or anything like that. Almost nobody is going to research the specific ft.lbs of energy for a standard round because it is a standard round. That kind of research is only going to be done when considering defensive ammo.

The .380 is already a sorta hot round, so if you make one, you should make it pretty sturdy and 40 ft.lbs of energy should not be able to make a difference between "normal function" and "catastrophic failure."

As a result of being made aware if this issue, I will never buy another Beretta product for myself and I will discontinue sales of Beretta firearms completely. Too many customers look to the retailer to "make things right" when it comes to this stuff and that usually translates to me assuring them that the manufacturer will take care of them.

Thankfully I don't stand to lose a lot, I don't sell a lot of Beretta products. But I have sold a few Bobcats set up with suppressors and it is usually a nice host gun. But if Beretta won't stand behind their .380 Tomcats, I'm not gonna try and sell anything they make.
The Tomcat is a .32 ACP…

armedpolak
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Post by armedpolak »

SteyrAUG wrote:
Wed Sep 15, 2021 1:01 am
I can sorta see both sides.

But honestly most people just look at the side of the gun, read .380 and proceed accordingly. It's not like dropping .357s into a .38, it's not like loading 9mm +P+ and not understanding what that is.

So if there is a "non specialty" .380 round that the Beretta is not rated for, that probably needs to be engraved on the slide. Guns get resold, often without the paperwork. How did this gun survive proof round testing?

The specific ammo involved is NOT rated +P or anything like that. Almost nobody is going to research the specific ft.lbs of energy for a standard round because it is a standard round. That kind of research is only going to be done when considering defensive ammo.

The .380 is already a sorta hot round, so if you make one, you should make it pretty sturdy and 40 ft.lbs of energy should not be able to make a difference between "normal function" and "catastrophic failure."

As a result of being made aware if this issue, I will never buy another Beretta product for myself and I will discontinue sales of Beretta firearms completely. Too many customers look to the retailer to "make things right" when it comes to this stuff and that usually translates to me assuring them that the manufacturer will take care of them.

Thankfully I don't stand to lose a lot, I don't sell a lot of Beretta products. But I have sold a few Bobcats set up with suppressors and it is usually a nice host gun. But if Beretta won't stand behind their .380 Tomcats, I'm not gonna try and sell anything they make.
Not .380, .32 AUTO aka ACP. S&B factory ammo.

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SteyrAUG
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Post by SteyrAUG »

Correction noted, but my point remains. And a .32 that can't eat standard .32 ammo is even more pathetic.

armedpolak
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Post by armedpolak »

SteyrAUG wrote:
Wed Sep 15, 2021 6:03 pm
Correction noted, but my point remains. And a .32 that can't eat standard .32 ammo is even more pathetic.
+1

I was told to put the information on Facebook, apparently gun companies react to that more in favor of the consumer...

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