Concerning the problem of deleting private messages, I just created a brand new forum on one of my domains and the error wasn't present. Over the weekend, I will try something, but it will require me to shut down the forum. I will try to do this at a less problematic time for you guys. I'll keep you posted but if the forum isn't available, it is because I am working on it.

Who carries appendix

Post a reply

Smilies
:D :) ;) :( :o :shock: :? 8-) :lol: :x :P :oops: :cry: :evil: :twisted: :roll: :!: :?: :idea: :arrow: :| :mrgreen: :geek: :ugeek:

BBCode is ON
[img] is ON
[flash] is OFF
[url] is ON
Smilies are ON

Topic review
   

Expand view Topic review: Who carries appendix

Re: Who carries appendix

by lakelandman » Wed Dec 19, 2018 11:47 pm

Appendix carry I hear to many stories of people shooting them self or for me being fat is getting the gun out fast enough for me. :shock:

Re: Who carries appendix

by REDinFL » Sun Dec 16, 2018 11:54 am

The real problem with a Glock is the "half-cock" design. The instant you chamber a round, the striker is partially cocked. The point of that design is reasonable at first glance - constant trigger pull weight. It would seem that the "safety-lever" in the middle of the trigger is the safety. Testing it (with Snap-Caps of course), one readily can see that pulling on the edge of the trigger won't set off the pistol but, touch that lever and even a light pull fires it. Holsters, especially generic tacti-cool types, are a disaster waiting to happen. As earlier in the thread, the trigger must be covered. Holstering the pistol comes with other exposures such as a t-shirt catching the trigger, as mentioned. The only protection is holstering carefully and watching while doing it. Even trained and experienced professionals can get fooled. On this site, about a year or more ago, there was an article about a police Sgt. who, while holstering his Glock, got a drawstring adjuster/lock (the drum style) from his windbreaker caught in the trigger housing. It was the perfect diameter for the trigger. Fortunately the discharge "only" gave him a burn. One needs watch carefully, not real easy in a high stress, quickly unfolding situation.

I used to carry a 1911 IWB, hammer down, and would cock it on draw. Got used to that a long time ago. But, that was the 1911A1; the newer iterations have the longer beavertail, interfering with my thumb. The manual safety looks good on paper, if one carries in a proper holster OWB. I've found that the safety can be worked to "off" while carrying IWB, though that may have something to do with my Dunlop (tire that done lopped over my belt).

So, I've migrated to a SIG. Main reason was to have consistent operation with my Summertime carry, a smaller pistol which is DAO. Now, I can have a round in the chamber, hammer down, and a heavier trigger pull on the first pull. The latter often is criticized but, it's just something to get used to. And, it's just forward of the hip bone.

Re: Who carries appendix

by Deputydave » Tue Nov 06, 2018 7:34 am

Just wish they weren't so expensive. That's a $19.99 item tops. $80 is ridiculous and nothing more than trying to cash in on the Glocktard market.

Re: Who carries appendix

by EDC Pistol Training » Mon Nov 05, 2018 4:06 pm

[/quote]

https://taudevgroup.myshopify.com/produ ... rol-device

I have these for my Glocks. No reason not to.
[/quote]

They work as advertised. If folks are worried about this, then I would recommend this product as well.

Re: Who carries appendix

by jwperry » Mon Nov 05, 2018 9:31 am

Deputydave wrote:
Sun Nov 04, 2018 5:47 am
That is not the only type of holster in which a striker-fired pistol has discharged without intent. And you are making an assumption that another brand of holster would have made a difference. It is a fact however that a manual thumb safety would have prevented a discharge.

A manual safety offers NO negatives and ONLY positives. If Glock offered a manual thumb safety on their civilian pistols, like they do for L.E. and military contracts you would have less instances of Glock-leg.
https://taudevgroup.myshopify.com/produ ... rol-device

I have these for my Glocks. No reason not to.

Re: Who carries appendix

by Deputydave » Mon Nov 05, 2018 7:39 am

I can disagree because I don't know you, know anything about you nor anything about your testing procedure(s). If you want to blame the holster I'm fine with that. I mentioned OWB and duty holsters as it pertains to the point(s) I've made. Your welcome to your viewpoint on striker-fired pistols. A manual thumb safety is inherently safer all the way around with nothing but positives and no negatives.

And that's why there are so many flavors of ice cream :D

Re: Who carries appendix

by EDC Pistol Training » Sun Nov 04, 2018 6:36 pm

Deputydave wrote:
Sun Nov 04, 2018 6:14 pm
I still have to disagree with your assessment. You weren't there and simply can't know that another type of holster would have prevented this accident. You can can make the assumption that another brand would have worked, but it is only an assumption. Either way it's really a moot point as OWB holsters, including duty holsters have had debris in them that have caused a discharge when the pistol was re-holstered. As I pointed out above, on Glock and most other striker-fired pistols placing your thumb on the back of the pistol isn't going to give you an indication of a problem like you would with a pistol or revolver that has a hammer. And of course properly engaging a manual thumb safety eliminates the problem altogether.

The simpliest solution when carrying a striker-fired pistol IWB is to remove the holster, insert the pistol and then insert the holstered pistol IWB. Or, if the striker-fired pistol has a manual thumb safety, simply engage it prior to re-holstering.
I don't know how you can disagree when we've tested the INCOG (the one in the video) and similar open underneath trigger guard holster designs and found they do allow a shirt to activate the trigger during holstering, and when we've tested other designs with a closed underneath trigger guard area and the shirt does not press against the trigger no matter how hard you try to push the gun into the holster.

OWB has nothing to do with this thread. It's a thread about AIWB and the ND in question was with an AIWB holster, and the holsters I'm talking about are all AIWB.

There's nothing inherently unsafe about a properly designed striker fired pistol, and when mated to a proper holster and gun handling skills is perfectly safe.

Re: Who carries appendix

by Deputydave » Sun Nov 04, 2018 6:14 pm

I still have to disagree with your assessment. You weren't there and simply can't know that another type of holster would have prevented this accident. You can can make the assumption that another brand would have worked, but it is only an assumption. Either way it's really a moot point as OWB holsters, including duty holsters have had debris in them that have caused a discharge when the pistol was re-holstered. As I pointed out above, on Glock and most other striker-fired pistols placing your thumb on the back of the pistol isn't going to give you an indication of a problem like you would with a pistol or revolver that has a hammer. And of course properly engaging a manual thumb safety eliminates the problem altogether.

The simpliest solution when carrying a striker-fired pistol IWB is to remove the holster, insert the pistol and then insert the holstered pistol IWB. Or, if the striker-fired pistol has a manual thumb safety, simply engage it prior to re-holstering.

Re: Who carries appendix

by EDC Pistol Training » Sun Nov 04, 2018 3:07 pm

Deputydave wrote:
Sun Nov 04, 2018 5:47 am
That is not the only type of holster in which a striker-fired pistol has discharged without intent. And you are making an assumption that another brand of holster would have made a difference. It is a fact however that a manual thumb safety would have prevented a discharge.

A manual safety offers NO negatives and ONLY positives. If Glock offered a manual thumb safety on their civilian pistols, like they do for L.E. and military contracts you would have less instances of Glock-leg.
Another brand/design of holster would have made a difference. This particular holster (and others like it) are not designed properly. Properly designed holsters prevent this type of discharge. I know because I've tested them.

I rolled with a 1911 cocked and locked for years, now I carry a Glock. I don't feel any more or less safe either way.

A properly designed and produced holster eliminates this type of issue.

Re: Who carries appendix

by Deputydave » Sun Nov 04, 2018 10:33 am

The term 'Glock leg' is generic. Glock's have a history of going off due to either a finger on the trigger (aka Barney Fife syndrome) or an unintended object in the holster that isn't noticed when the pistol is reholstered. The first I'm aware of comes back in the 80's when a twig was in the holster of a police officer that had chased a bad guy through the woods. His sidearm discharged upon reholstering.

Doesn't mean Glock or any striker-fired pistol is necessarily unsafe but it does have a higher likelyhood of discharge than a DA pistol/revolver or one with a safety. That's just the nature of the beast. The reason is simple, a striker fired pistol has a light trigger pull and there is no way,other than an expensive aftermarket part, to realize the trigger is being engaged while inserting it in a holster. A DA pistol or revolver on the other hand will have the hammer travelling reward which can be felt with the thumb (which was the way it was trained back in the day during reholstering).

So a Glock or other striker fired pistol is safe from the aspect you can drop it or throw in against a wall and it won't discharge. There is an inherent risk of discharge however as explained above.

S&W M&P line as well as Ruger, HK and others offer the consumer an option of manual thumb safety or not. That's the proper way to do it i.e. provide the option and let the consumer decide. Although I like and carry Glock, this is a failing on their part. That and they're overpriced and come with plastic sights.

Top